Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation: basic science mechanisms and clinical effectiveness.

@article{Sluka2003TranscutaneousEN,
  title={Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation: basic science mechanisms and clinical effectiveness.},
  author={Kathleen A. Sluka and Deirdre M. Walsh},
  journal={The journal of pain : official journal of the American Pain Society},
  year={2003},
  volume={4 3},
  pages={
          109-21
        }
}
  • K. Sluka, D. Walsh
  • Published 1 April 2003
  • Medicine, Psychology
  • The journal of pain : official journal of the American Pain Society
Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is used clinically by a variety of health care professionals for the reduction of pain. Clinical effectiveness of TENS is controversial, with some studies supporting whereas others refute its clinical use. Although used by health professionals for decades, the mechanisms by which TENS produces analgesia or reduces pain are only recently being elucidated. This article describes the basic science mechanisms behind different frequencies of TENS… 

Figures and Tables from this paper

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TLDR
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  • Medicine
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  • 2009
TLDR
Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is a technique used to relieve pain by applying electrical energy to peripheral nerves via skin electrodes placed over the region of maximal pain, believed to be explained by the ‘gate control theory’ described by Melzack in 1965.
Role of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation in post-operative analgesia
TLDR
Clinical trials investigating post-operative analgesic effects of TENS have demonstrated clinically significant reduction in pain intensity and supplemental analgesic requirement, however, these trials vary in TENS parameters used that is, duration, intensity, frequency of stimulation and location of electrodes.
The effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on experimental pain and sympathetic nervous system response.
TLDR
No support was found for TENS affecting either SNS function or acute experimental pain perception in healthy volunteers, and these results may not generalize to acute or chronic pain patients.
Basic Understanding of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation
TLDR
Basic understanding of TENS including its underlying mechanisms and stimulation parameters is focused on to increase the therapeutic effect and decrease the risk of possible side effects.
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References

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Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) for chronic pain.
TLDR
The results of this review are inconclusive; the published trials do not provide information on the stimulation parameters which are most likely to provide optimum pain relief, nor do they answer questions about long-term effectiveness.
Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for the control of pain in musculoskeletal disorders.
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  • Medicine
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TLDR
The literature on the use of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) for pain control in several common musculoskeletal disorders is reviewed to assist the reader in understanding the relative value of TENS studies which either support or refute the efficacy of electrical stimulation procedures forPain control.
Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) for chronic low-back pain.
TLDR
There is inconsistent evidence to support the use of TENS as a single treatment in the management of chronic LBP, and larger, multi-center, randomized controlled trials are needed to better assess the true effectiveness of Tens.
Long-term transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) use: impact on medication utilization and physical therapy costs.
TLDR
Long-term use of TENS is associated with a significant reduction in the utilization of pain medication and physical/occupational therapy (PT/OT) use, and cost simulations indicate that with long-term TENS use, costs can be reduced up to 55% for medications and up to 69% for PT/OT.
Pain relief in labour by transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS)
TLDR
It was found that during TENS application the pain scores were significantly lower, but no statistically significant difference in incidence of epidural analgesia was found between the experimental group and the control group.
The effect of varying frequency and intensity of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on secondary mechanical hyperalgesia in an animal model of inflammation.
  • E. W. King, K. Sluka
  • Biology, Medicine
    The journal of pain : official journal of the American Pain Society
  • 2001
TLDR
Either low- or high-frequency TENS is equally successful in reducing secondary mechanicalhyperalgesia and selection of TENS should be based on patient comfort and symptoms for relief of secondary mechanical hyperalgesIA.
The effect of transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation on postoperative pain and pulmonary function.
TLDR
The data suggest that TENS minimizes the tendency toward postoperative alteration in respiratory mechanics and decreases the incidence of pulmonary complications by alleviating incisional pain.
Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) for adjuvant pain‐relief during labor and delivery
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