Transcranial magnetic stimulation improves naming in Alzheimer disease patients at different stages of cognitive decline

@article{Cotelli2008TranscranialMS,
  title={Transcranial magnetic stimulation improves naming in Alzheimer disease patients at different stages of cognitive decline},
  author={M. Cotelli and R. Manenti and S. Cappa and O. Zanetti and C. Miniussi},
  journal={European Journal of Neurology},
  year={2008},
  volume={15}
}
Objective:  Word‐finding difficulty (anomia) is commonly observed in Alzheimer’s dementia (AD). The aim of this study was to assess the effect of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) applied to the dorso‐lateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) on picture naming in 24 probable AD patients with different degrees of cognitive decline. 
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