Transcortical sensory aphasia: Evidence for subtypes

@article{Coslett1987TranscorticalSA,
  title={Transcortical sensory aphasia: Evidence for subtypes},
  author={H. Branch Coslett and David P. Roeltgen and Leslie J. Gonzalez Rothi and Kenneth M. Heilman},
  journal={Brain and Language},
  year={1987},
  volume={32},
  pages={362-378}
}
Impaired auditory comprehension and fluent but semantically empty speech in conjunction with preserved repetition characterize the syndrome of transcortical sensory aphasia (TSA). Repetition, however, may be mediated by at least two distinct processes--a lexical process that may involve the recognition and subsequent activation of discrete stored word representations and a nonlexical process that involves phonologic decoding and immediate phonologic encoding from immediate memory. We… Expand
Transcortical sensory aphasia: revisited and revised.
TLDR
The results suggest that TSA may result from a one-way disruption between left hemisphere phonology and lexical-semantic processing. Expand
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Abstract Although anomia in transcortical sensory aphasia (TSA) is usually described as a semantically based deficit (naming and recognition are equally affected), dissociations in naming performanceExpand
Repetition and verbal STM in transcortical sensory aphasia: A case study
TLDR
The repetition performance of a patient (S.T.) with transcortical sensory aphasia is examined in four experiments with particular emphasis on the STM capacities underlying her performance, indicating that access to lexical information is brief and dependent on recent phonological input. Expand
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TLDR
Analysis of the language function of patients with transcortical sensory aphasia, of the influence of sensory modalities on language function, and of the interaction between semantic memory and semantic lexical functions suggests the existence of a specific brain system for semantic functions. Expand
Mixed Transcortical Aphasia in Nonfamilial Dysphasic Dementia
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The neurolinguistic and cognitive profiles of a patient with mixed transcortical aphasia and non-familial dysphasic dementia associated with progressive, left perisylvian involution suggest that the pathological process resulted in a relative disconnection of integral frontal and parieto-occipital areas from adjacent perisyllvian language zones. Expand
Repetition and the arcuate fasciculus
TLDR
This work proposes that the arcuate fasciculus is not necessary for speech repetition by the lexical route and describes a man with normal language architecture who underwent a resection of the anterior portion of his arcuate Fasciculus and retained his ability to repeat words and sentences. Expand
Unexpected brain-language relationships in aphasia: Evidence from transcortical sensory aphasia associated with frontal lobe lesions
The syndrome of transcortical sensory aphasia (TCSA) is usually associated with extraperisylvian lesions of the left hemisphere that involve either posterior cortical regions (temporal-occipitalExpand
A proposed reinterpretation and reclassification of aphasic syndromes
Background: Different classifications of aphasic disorders have been proposed over the years. During recent decades new approaches to aphasia study have been developed, suggesting that currentExpand
Trancortical alexia with agraphia folowing a right temporo-occipital hematoma in a right-handed patient
TLDR
The case of a 51-year-old right-handed man who was affected by a transcortical alexia with agraphia and aphasia, hypothesize that this particular syndrome was the result of a double disconnection. Expand
The cortical organization of lexical knowledge: A dual lexicon model of spoken language processing
  • D. Gow
  • Medicine, Psychology
  • Brain and Language
  • 2012
TLDR
Evidence is drawn on from aphasia, functional imaging, neuroanatomy, laboratory phonology and behavioral results to argue for the existence of parallel lexica that facilitate different processes in the dorsal and ventral speech pathways. Expand
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