Transatlantic Interracial Sisterhoods: Sarah Remond, Ellen Craft, and Harriet Jacobs in England

@article{Salenius2017TransatlanticIS,
  title={Transatlantic Interracial Sisterhoods: Sarah Remond, Ellen Craft, and Harriet Jacobs in England},
  author={Sirpa Salenius},
  journal={Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies},
  year={2017},
  volume={38},
  pages={166 - 196}
}
  • Sirpa Salenius
  • Published 12 April 2017
  • History
  • Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies
15 Citations

Mistresses as Masters?

Recent texts in the historiography of slavery have focused on slave-owning women in an attempt to overturn the paradigm of the benevolent mistress. While “benevolence” has silenced and

Introduction

  • Advocates of Freedom
  • 2020

“The Black People’s Side of the Story”

  • History
    Advocates of Freedom
  • 2020

“My Name Is Not Tom”

  • Education
    Advocates of Freedom
  • 2020

Conclusion

  • Advocates of Freedom
  • 2020

“[They Have] Not Ceased to Hold My Hand Since”

  • Education
    Advocates of Freedom
  • 2020

Advocates of Freedom

During the nineteenth century and especially after the Civil War, scores of black abolitionists like Frederick Douglass, Moses Roper and Ellen Craft travelled to England, Ireland, Scotland, and parts

Bibliography

  • Advocates of Freedom
  • 2020

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 64 REFERENCES

Introduction

Throughout history in the Indian Ocean World (IOW) diseases have, under certain distinctive geographical and climatic conditions, emerged and spread, generating a number of impacts on varying spatial

Harriet Jacobs: A Life

Harriet Jacobs's Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl remains the most-read woman's slave narrative of all time. Jean Fagan Yellin recounts the experiences that shaped Incidents-the years Jacobs

Radical narratives of the Black Atlantic

Uprooted and Re-Routed - Actual and Imaginative Biographies of the Black Atlantic "I Had a Cork in My Ass and I Couldn't Go Down" - Surviving the Middle Passage - A Counter-Historical Reading of Oral

The "Mysteries and Miseries" of North Carolina: New York City, Urban Gothic Fiction, and Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl

The extraordinary epigraph on the title page of the first edition of Harriet Jacobs’s Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (1861) makes a startling assertion about the evils of Southern slavery. In

We Are Your Sisters: Black Women In The Nineteenth Century

Documents the trials and joys of nineteenth-century Black women and suggests new ways of perceiving Black women, their relations with others, and their attitudes toward family, work, and feminism.
...