Trans fatty acids and coronary heart disease.

@article{Ascherio1999TransFA,
  title={Trans fatty acids and coronary heart disease.},
  author={A. Ascherio and M. Katan and P. Zock and M. Stampfer and W. Willett},
  journal={The New England journal of medicine},
  year={1999},
  volume={340 25},
  pages={
          1994-8
        }
}
Trans unsaturated fatty acids are produced commercially in large quantities by heating vegetable oils in the presence of metal catalysts and hydrogen to form shortening and margarine.1 They are so named because the carbon atoms adjacent to their double bonds are on opposite sides, resulting in a straight configuration and a solid state at room temperature. In contrast, naturally occurring unsaturated fatty acids contain double bonds as cis isomers, with adjacent carbons on the same side of the… Expand

Paper Mentions

Interventional Clinical Trial
The aim of the study is to compare a diet rich in trans fatty acids (TFA) from ruminant sources with a diet rich in TFA from hydrogenated vegetable oils (PHVO) in regard to their… Expand
ConditionsHealthy
InterventionDietary Supplement
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  • S. Stender
  • Chemistry, Medicine
  • The American journal of clinical nutrition
  • 2015
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Trans fatty acids (TFAs) are positional isomers of cis fatty acids. TFAs are mainly produced by partial hydrogenation of unsaturated fatty acids and widely found in a variety of foods, includingExpand
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References

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TLDR
The combined results of metabolic and epidemiological studies provide strong evidence that trans fatty acid intake is causally related to risk of coronary disease and federal regulations should require manufacturers to include trans fatty acids content in food labels and should aim to greatly reduce or eliminate the use of partially hydrogenated vegetable fats. Expand
Trans-fatty-acid content of common foods.
To the Editor: Trans fatty acids, which are created by the partial hydrogenation of liquid vegetable oils in the manufacturing of margarine and vegetable shortening, increase serum levels ofExpand
The role of unnatural dietary trans and cis unsaturated fatty acids in the epidemiology of coronary artery disease.
TLDR
It is proposed that on the basis of available evidence, unnatural dietary trans and cis unsaturated fatty acid isomers should be regarded as a definite risk factor in the etiology of coronary artery disease. Expand
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TLDR
The consumption of products that are low in trans fatty acids and saturated fat has beneficial effects on serum lipoprotein cholesterol levels, andRatios of total cholesterol to HDL cholesterol were lowest after the consumption of the soybean-oil diet and semiliquid-margarine diet and highest after the stick-Margarine diet. Expand
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TLDR
Overall, there was no evidence of a relation between trans isomers of oleic and linoleic acids combined and sudden cardiac death, and smoking was the only factor that remained independently associated with risk ofudden cardiac death. Expand
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TLDR
Trans and cis unsaturated fatty acids are not equivalent, and diets aimed at reducing the risk of coronary heart disease should be low in both trans and saturated fatty acids. Expand
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TLDR
The results reflect considerable differences between countries in dietary intake of trans fatty acids but do not suggest a major overall effect of C18:1 trans fatty fatty acids on risk of AMI, although it cannot exclude the possibility that trans fatty acid have a significant impact on riskof AMI in populations with high intake. Expand
Trans-fatty acids intake and risk of myocardial infarction.
TLDR
The hypothesis that intake of partially hydrogenated vegetable oils may contribute to the risk of myocardial infarction is supported, after adjustment for established coronary risk factors, multivitamin use, and intake of saturated fat, monounsaturated fat, linoleic acid, dietary cholesterol, vitamins E and C, carotene, and fiber. Expand
Effect of dietary trans fatty acids on high-density and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in healthy subjects.
TLDR
The effect of trans fatty acids on the serum lipoprotein profile is at least as unfavorable as that of the cholesterol-raising saturated fatty acids, because they not only raise LDL cholesterol levels but also lower HDL cholesterol levels. Expand
Hydrogenation impairs the hypolipidemic effect of corn oil in humans. Hydrogenation, trans fatty acids, and plasma lipids.
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