Trans fatty acids and cardiovascular risk: A unique cardiometabolic imprint?

@article{Mozaffarian2007TransFA,
  title={Trans fatty acids and cardiovascular risk: A unique cardiometabolic imprint?},
  author={Dariush Mozaffarian and Walter C. Willett},
  journal={Current Atherosclerosis Reports},
  year={2007},
  volume={9},
  pages={486-493}
}
Evidence from randomized controlled trials indicates that consumption of trans fatty acids (TFA) leads to harmful changes in serum lipids, systemic inflammation, endothelial function, and, in nonhuman primates, visceral adiposity and insulin resistance. Prospective observational studies demonstrate strong positive associations between TFA consumption and risk of myocardial infarction, coronary heart disease death, and sudden death. Links have also been seen between TFA intake and incidence of… Expand
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