Trans fatty acids and cardiovascular disease.

@article{Mozaffarian2006TransFA,
  title={Trans fatty acids and cardiovascular disease.},
  author={D. Mozaffarian and M. Katan and A. Ascherio and M. Stampfer and W. Willett},
  journal={The New England journal of medicine},
  year={2006},
  volume={354 15},
  pages={
          1601-13
        }
}
The intake of trans fat has been associated with coronary heart disease, sudden death from cardiac causes, and diabetes. This article reviews the evidence for physiological and cellular effects of trans fatty acids, unsaturated fatty acids with at least one double bond in the trans configuration. The authors consider the feasibility and potential implications of reducing or eliminating the consumption of trans fatty acids from partially hydrogenated vegetable oils in the United States. 
Trans fatty acids, cardiovascular health, and policy implications
TLDR
Both individual-level and policy-level initiatives to reduce the global consumption of industrial TFA intake should be a priority. Expand
Trans fats in cardiac and diabetes risk: An overview
TLDR
Educating the public about the sources and hazards of trans fats, combined with voluntary use of trans-free alternatives by restaurants and food manufacturers and possibly legislation that limits their use, could avert thousands of coronary heart disease events each year in the United States. Expand
Saturated and trans fatty acids and coronary heart disease
TLDR
More high-quality, randomized controlled trials on fatty acids and CHD are required, but public health recommendations to reduce intake of both saturated and trans fatty acids are appropriate based on the current evidence. Expand
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The data supporting a negative effect of dietary trans -fatty acids on cardiovascular disease risk are consistent. The primary dietary sources of trans -fatty acids include partially hydrogenated fatExpand
[Quality of fat intake, atherosclerosis and coronary disease: effects of saturated and trans fatty acids].
TLDR
A more detailed exploration of the potential benefit and risks of specific saturated and trans fatty acids is needed in order to update dietary recommendations. Expand
Trans Fatty Acid Isomers in Mortality and Incident Coronary Heart Disease Risk
While nutrition remains a cornerstone to prevent adverse health outcomes, including chronic noncommunicable conditions such as cardiovascular disease (CVD)[1][1] and cancer,[2][2] the quantity andExpand
Trans fatty acids linked to myocardial infarction and stroke: What is the evidence?
TLDR
Observational studies have shown that consumption of TFA produced by partial hydrogenation of vegetable oils is associated with increased mortality and incidence of MI and stroke rates, and regulatory initiatives to restrict PHOs to less than 2 g per day from food sources have been associated with reduction in cardiovascular mortality and MI rates. Expand
Dietary fats and cardiovascular disease: putting together the pieces of a complicated puzzle.
TLDR
The total matrix of a food is more important than just its fatty acid content in predicting the effect of aFood on CVD risk, and a healthy diet should be the cornerstone of CVD prevention. Expand
Dietary Trans Fatty Acids and Cardiovascular Disease Risk: Past and Present
TLDR
Although at this time some issues remain unresolved regarding trans fatty acids and CVD risk factors other than plasma lipoprotein concentrations, they should not affect the final dietary recommendation to limit intake. Expand
Trans-Fatty Acids and Cardiovascular Disease: Urgent Need for Legislation
TLDR
Legal TFA limits should be commonly established as they are the optimal solution considering both CVD prevention and the associated cost savings in public healthcare. Expand
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TLDR
Intakes of foods that are major sources of trans isomers (margarine, cookies [biscuits], cake, and white bread) were each significantly associated with higher risks of CHD, supporting the hypothesis that consumption of partially hydrogenated vegetable oils may contribute to occurrence ofCHD. Expand
Replacement of Dietary Saturated Fatty Acids by Trans Fatty Acids Lowers Serum HDL Cholesterol and Impairs Endothelial Function in Healthy Men and Women
TLDR
Replacement of dietary saturated fatty acids by trans fatty acids impaired FMD of the brachial artery, which suggests increased risk of CHD. Expand
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
The possibility that cognate receptors exist for fatty acids or their metabolites that are able to regulate gene expression and coordinately affect metabolic or signaling pathways associated with coronary heart disease is discussed. Expand
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TLDR
In young healthy women, the TFA diet resulted in a higher total/HDL cholesterol ratio and an elevation in triglyceride and apo B concentrations but had no effect on glucose and insulin metabolism compared with the MUFA diet. Expand
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TLDR
Evidence that dietary fatty acids can modulate markers of inflammation is provided, although stearic acid minimally affects LDL cholesterol, it does appear to increase fibrinogen concentrations. Expand
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