Trans-fatty acids, dangerous bonds for health? A background review paper of their use, consumption, health implications and regulation in France

@article{Menaa2012TransfattyAD,
  title={Trans-fatty acids, dangerous bonds for health? A background review paper of their use, consumption, health implications and regulation in France},
  author={F. Menaa and A. Menaa and B. Menaa and J. Tr{\'e}ton},
  journal={European Journal of Nutrition},
  year={2012},
  volume={52},
  pages={1289-1302}
}
IntroductionTrans-fatty acids (TFAs) can be produced either from bio-hydrogenation in the rumen of ruminants or by industrial hydrogenation. While most of TFAs’ effects from ruminants are poorly established, there is increasing evidence that high content of industrial TFAs may cause deleterious effects on human health and life span.Material and methodsIndeed, several epidemiological and experimental studies strongly suggest that high content of most TFA isomers could represent a higher risk of… Expand
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