Training adults with acquired brain injury how to help-seek when wayfinding: an understudied critical life skill.

Abstract

The objective of this study was to investigate the efficacy of a group treatment protocol called NICE (Noticing you have a problem, Identifying the information you need for help, Compensatory strategies, Evaluating progress) to train help-seeking when wayfinding for individuals with acquired brain injury (ABI). Seven participants completed the NICE group treatment in an outpatient rehabilitation department at a university medical centre. A single subject multiple baseline design was employed to evaluate the efficacy of the NICE group treatment. The Social Behaviour Rating Scale and the Executive Function Route-Finding Task- Revised were repeated measures used to evaluate potential changes in help-seeking and wayfinding. Secondary outcome measures included pre- and post-treatment evaluation of social problem solving and social cognition. Results revealed that all participants improved on measures of help-seeking and wayfinding. Patterns of improvement and implications for rehabilitation are discussed. This is the first experimental study to evaluate the treatment of help-seeking behaviours and discuss its application to wayfinding in adults with ABI. Preliminary evidence supports further investigation of the NICE group treatment protocol.

DOI: 10.1080/09602011.2017.1344131

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Cite this paper

@article{Cho2017TrainingAW, title={Training adults with acquired brain injury how to help-seek when wayfinding: an understudied critical life skill.}, author={Young Susan Cho and McKay Moore Sohlberg and Richard W. Albin and Leonard Diller and Robert H Horner and Joseph Rath and Michael Bullis}, journal={Neuropsychological rehabilitation}, year={2017}, pages={1-18} }