Trading off short-term costs for long-term gains: how do bumblebees decide to learn morphologically complex flowers?

@article{Muth2015TradingOS,
  title={Trading off short-term costs for long-term gains: how do bumblebees decide to learn morphologically complex flowers?},
  author={Felicity Muth and Tamar Keasar and Anna R. Dornhaus},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2015},
  volume={101},
  pages={191-199}
}

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