Trade-offs between growth and maturation: the cost of reproduction for surviving environmental extremes

@article{Luhring2015TradeoffsBG,
  title={Trade-offs between growth and maturation: the cost of reproduction for surviving environmental extremes},
  author={Thomas M. Luhring and Ricardo M. Holdo},
  journal={Oecologia},
  year={2015},
  volume={178},
  pages={723 - 732}
}
Life-history trade-offs and the costs of reproduction are central concepts in evolution and ecology. Episodic climatic events such as drought and extreme temperatures provide strong selective pressures that can change the balance of these costs and trade-offs. We used size-structured matrix models parameterized from field and laboratory studies to examine the effect of periodic drought on two species of aquatic salamanders (greater siren, Siren lacertina; lesser siren, Siren intermedia) that… 

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  • Environmental Science
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  • 2016
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