Tracing Problem Solving in Real Time: fMRI Analysis of the Subject-paced Tower of Hanoi

@article{Anderson2005TracingPS,
  title={Tracing Problem Solving in Real Time: fMRI Analysis of the Subject-paced Tower of Hanoi},
  author={John R. Anderson and Mark V. Albert and Jon M. Fincham},
  journal={Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience},
  year={2005},
  volume={17},
  pages={1261-1274}
}
Previous research has found three brain regions for tracking components of the ACT-R cognitive architecture: a posterior parietal region that tracks changes in problem representation, a prefrontal region that tracks retrieval of task-relevant information, and a motor region that tracks the programming of manual responses. This prior research has used relatively simple tasks to incorporate a slow event-related procedure, allowing the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) response to go back to… 
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