Toxoplasma gondii‐induced neuronal alterations

@article{Parlog2015ToxoplasmaGN,
  title={Toxoplasma gondii‐induced neuronal alterations},
  author={A. Parlog and D. Schl{\"u}ter and I. Dunay},
  journal={Parasite Immunology},
  year={2015},
  volume={37}
}
The zoonotic pathogen Toxoplasma gondii infects over 30% of the human population. The intracellular parasite can persist lifelong in the CNS within neurons modifying their function and structure, thus leading to specific behavioural changes of the host. In recent years, several in vitro studies and murine models have focused on the elucidation of these modifications. Furthermore, investigations of the human population have correlated Toxoplasma seropositivity with changes in neurological… Expand
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