Toxicodendron Dermatitis: Poison Ivy, Oak, and Sumac

@inproceedings{Gladman2006ToxicodendronDP,
  title={Toxicodendron Dermatitis: Poison Ivy, Oak, and Sumac},
  author={A Gladman},
  booktitle={Wilderness \& environmental medicine},
  year={2006}
}
  • A. Gladman
  • Published in
    Wilderness & environmental…
    1 June 2006
  • Medicine
Abstract Allergic contact dermatitis caused by the Toxicodendron (formerly Rhus) species—poison ivy, poison oak, and poison sumac—affects millions of North Americans every year. In certain outdoor occupations, for example, agriculture and forestry, as well as among many outdoor enthusiasts, Toxicodendron dermatitis presents a significant hazard. This review considers the epidemiology, identification, immunochemistry, pathophysiology, clinical features, treatment, and prevention of this common… 
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