Corpus ID: 9925504

Toxic effects of the easily avoidable phthalates and parabens.

@article{Crinnion2010ToxicEO,
  title={Toxic effects of the easily avoidable phthalates and parabens.},
  author={Walter J Crinnion},
  journal={Alternative medicine review : a journal of clinical therapeutic},
  year={2010},
  volume={15 3},
  pages={
          190-6
        }
}
  • W. Crinnion
  • Published 1 September 2010
  • Medicine
  • Alternative medicine review : a journal of clinical therapeutic
Some environmental toxins like DDT and other chlorinated compounds accumulate in the body because of their fat-soluble nature. Other compounds do not stay long in the body, but still cause toxic effects during the time they are present. For serious health problems to arise, exposure to these rapidly-clearing compounds must occur on a daily basis. Two such classes of compounds are the phthalate plasticizers and parabens, both of which are used in many personal care products, some medications… Expand

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