Toxic Moths: Source of a Truly Safe Delicacy

@inproceedings{Zagrobelny2009ToxicMS,
  title={Toxic Moths: Source of a Truly Safe Delicacy},
  author={Mika Zagrobelny and A. L. Dreon and T. Gomiero and G. Marcazzan and M. A. Glaring and B. M{\o}ller and M. Paoletti},
  year={2009}
}
Abstract A field survey of local traditional food habits in northern Italy revealed that children in Carnia have traditionally eaten sweet ingluvies (the crop) from day flying moths of the genus Zygaena and its mimic, Syntomis. These moths are brightly colored, and all species of Zygaena contain cyanogenic glucosides, which release toxic hydrogen cyanide upon degradation. The presence of cyanogenic glucosides in larvae and imagos (adults) as well as in ingluvies of Zygaena and Syntomis moths… Expand
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