Towards weighing individual atoms by high-angle scattering of electrons.

@article{Argentero2015TowardsWI,
  title={Towards weighing individual atoms by high-angle scattering of electrons.},
  author={G. Argentero and C. Mangler and J. Kotakoski and F. Eder and J. Meyer},
  journal={Ultramicroscopy},
  year={2015},
  volume={151},
  pages={
          23-30
        }
}
  • G. Argentero, C. Mangler, +2 authors J. Meyer
  • Published 2015
  • Physics, Medicine, Chemistry
  • Ultramicroscopy
  • We consider theoretically the energy loss of electrons scattered to high angles when assuming that the primary beam can be limited to a single atom. We discuss the possibility of identifying the isotopes of light elements and of extracting information about phonons in this signal. The energy loss is related to the mass of the much heavier nucleus, and is spread out due to atomic vibrations. Importantly, while the width of the broadening is much larger than the energy separation of isotopes… CONTINUE READING

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