Towards a vaccine for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

@article{Clancy2012TowardsAV,
  title={Towards a vaccine for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease},
  author={R L Clancy},
  journal={Internal Medicine Journal},
  year={2012},
  volume={42}
}
  • R. Clancy
  • Published 1 June 2012
  • Medicine, Biology
  • Internal Medicine Journal
This review discusses chronic obstructive pulmonary disease as an outcome of two pathogenic pathways: the first resulting from inhalation of toxins and the second a consequence of bacterial colonisation of damaged airways. Earlier assessment of the role played by bacteria in acute exacerbations was compromised by a deficiency of quality data and the use of parameters more relevant to invasive infection. Data are reviewed to support a hypothesis that states intrabronchial inflammation reflects… 
Understanding nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
TLDR
A causal link between NTHi and COPD exacerbations has not been clearly established, however, colonization of the lower airways by N THi likely plays a significant role in the inflammatory state of COPD.
An Oral Whole-Cell Killed Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Immunotherapeutic For The Prevention Of Acute Exacerbations Of Chronic Airway Disease
  • R. Clancy, A. Cripps
  • Medicine, Biology
    International journal of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
  • 2019
TLDR
It is concluded that whole-cell killed NTHi immunotherapy has consistent and significant benefits when examined in the context of changing clinical disease definitions, age and gender, and has the potential to change the natural history of chronic airway disease.
COPD_A_217317 2423..2431
TLDR
It is concluded that whole-cell killed NTHi immunotherapy has consistent and significant benefits when examined in the context of changing clinical disease definitions, age and gender, and has the potential to change the natural history of chronic airway disease.
Multi‐site placebo‐controlled randomised clinical trial to assess protection following oral immunisation with inactivated non‐typeable Haemophilus influenzae in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
TLDR
Factors that modify response to an oral non‐typeable Haemophilus influenzae vaccine in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD): severe COPD, moderate–severe exacerbations as end‐point and a threshold prevalence of NTHi in the study population are identified.
Recent Publications on Medications and Pharmacy
Hospital Pharmacy presents this feature to keep pharmacists abreast of new publications in the medical/pharmacy literature. Articles of interest regarding a broad scope of topics are abstracted
Recent Publications on Medications and Pharmacy
Hospital Pharmacy Hospital Pharmacy presents this feature to keep pharmacists abreast of new publications in the medical/pharmacy literature. Articles of interest regarding a broad scope of topics
Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a review for clinicians
TLDR
This review will summarize the current literature concerning the role of NTHi infections in COPD patients and the consequences of using prophylactic antibiotics in patients with COPD, with particular focus on the rationale, findings of clinical studies and possible future directions of Nthi vaccines in patientswith COPD.

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 251 REFERENCES
Acute Exacerbations in COPD and Their Control with Oral Immunization with Non-Typeable Haemophilus Influenzae
TLDR
A hypothesis that acute exacerbations reflect a T cell-dependent hypersensitivity response to colonizing bacteria, with IL-17 dependent accumulation of neutrophils within the bronchus, as the main outcome measure is discussed.
Inflammatory profile of new bacterial strain exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.
TLDR
Neutrophilic airway inflammation and systemic inflammation are more intense with well-defined bacterial exacerbations than with nonbacterial exacerbations, and clinical course of exacerbation and inflammation are closely linked.
Haemophilus influenzae Infection Drives IL-17-Mediated Neutrophilic Allergic Airways Disease
TLDR
H. influenzae infection synergizes with AAD to induce Th17 immune responses that drive the development of neutrophilic and suppress eosinophilic inflammation during AAD, which results in a phenotype that is similar to neutrophobic asthma.
The oral administration of bacterial extracts prevents asthma via the recruitment of regulatory T cells to the airways
TLDR
Investigation of whether bacterial extracts, commercially available as Broncho-Vaxom (BV), could prevent allergic airway disease in mice found it to be a safe and efficient strategy to prevent the development of allergic diseases in children.
Haemophilus influenzae oral whole cell vaccination for preventing acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis.
TLDR
Vaccinating patients with recurrent acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis in the autumn may reduce the number and severity of exacerbations over the following winter.
An animal model demonstration of enhanced clearance of nontypable Haemophilus influenzae from the respiratory tract after antigen stimulation of gut-associated lymphoid tissue.
TLDR
No clear correlation between local or systemic antibody and bacterial clearance was demonstrated; however, immunized rats were shown to have faster recruitment of phagocytic cells to the bronchial spaces, and these phagocytes had a higher activity state than cells harvested from nonimmunized animals.
Oral non‐typable Haemophilus influenzae enhances physiological mechanism of airways protection
TLDR
The evidence for protection was a stable IgG antibody level through the study in the oral NTHi treatment group, contrasting with an increase in antibody correlating with exposure of the airways to H. influenzae in the placebo group.
Protection against recurrent acute bronchitis after oral immunization with killed Haemophilus influenzae
TLDR
This is the first demonstration that the common mucosal system can be activated to modify a colonization pattern at a distant site, suggesting that individual episodes of acute bronchitis in subjects taking an oral preparation of killed H. influenzae were less severe than in those taking placebo tablets.
Bacterial colonisation of the respiratory tract in chronic bronchitis.
TLDR
Biotyping of H. influenzae isolates demonstrated a separate colonisation of the upper and lower respiratory tracts, and quantitative analysis of cultures of oropharyngeal swabs showed little difference from age matched normal controls.
The Airway Epithelium: Soldier in the Fight against Respiratory Viruses
SUMMARY The airway epithelium acts as a frontline defense against respiratory viruses, not only as a physical barrier and through the mucociliary apparatus but also through its immunological
...
...