Towards a more dynamic plant morphology

@article{Sattler1990TowardsAM,
  title={Towards a more dynamic plant morphology},
  author={R. Sattler},
  journal={Acta Biotheoretica},
  year={1990},
  volume={38},
  pages={303-315}
}
  • R. Sattler
  • Published 1 December 1990
  • Biology
  • Acta Biotheoretica
From the point of view of a dynamic morphology, form is not only the result of process(es) — it is process. This process may be analyzed in terms of two pairs of fundamental processes: growth and decay, differentiation and dedifferentiation. Each of these processes can be analyzed in terms of various modalities (parameters) and submodalities. This paper deals with those of growth (see Table 1). For the purpose of systematits and phylogenetic reconstruction the modalities and submodalities can… 
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