Towards a humane veterinary education.

@article{Martinsen2005TowardsAH,
  title={Towards a humane veterinary education.},
  author={Siri Martinsen and Nick Jukes},
  journal={Journal of veterinary medical education},
  year={2005},
  volume={32 4},
  pages={
          454-60
        }
}
There is a vast array of learning tools and approaches to veterinary education, many tried and true, many innovative and with potential. Such new methods have come about partly from an increasing demand from both students and teachers to avoid methods of teaching and training that harm animals. The aim is to create the best quality education, ideally supported by validation of the efficacy of particular educational tools and approaches, while ensuring that animals are not used harmfully and… 
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