Towards a bottom-up perspective on animal and human cognition

@article{Waal2010TowardsAB,
  title={Towards a bottom-up perspective on animal and human cognition},
  author={Frans B.M. de Waal and Pier Francesco Ferrari},
  journal={Trends in Cognitive Sciences},
  year={2010},
  volume={14},
  pages={201-207}
}
Over the last few decades, comparative cognitive research has focused on the pinnacles of mental evolution, asking all-or-nothing questions such as which animals (if any) possess a theory of mind, culture, linguistic abilities, future planning, and so on. Research programs adopting this top-down perspective have often pitted one taxon against another, resulting in sharp dividing lines. Insight into the underlying mechanisms has lagged behind. A dramatic change in focus now seems to be under way… 
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