Towards a New Study of the So-Called Tārīkh al-fattāsh

@article{Nobili2015TowardsAN,
  title={Towards a New Study of the So-Called Tārīkh al-fattāsh},
  author={Mauro Nobili and Mohamed Shahid Mathee},
  journal={History in Africa},
  year={2015},
  volume={42},
  pages={37 - 73}
}
Abstract This article advances a new theory about the composition of the chronicle generally referred to as Tārīkh al-fattāsh. The Tārīkh al-fattāsh, allegedly written in the sixteenth-seventeenth century, is one of the most famous chronicles on which scholars have relied for information about West Africa’s pre-colonial history. However, there are still many puzzling issues and unsolved problems associated with this work, as edited by Octave V. Houdas and Maurice Delafosse in the early… 
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