Toward the reconstruction of Proto-Algonquian-Wakashan. Part 1: Proof of the Algonquian-Wakashan relationship

@article{Nikolaev2015TowardTR,
  title={Toward the reconstruction of Proto-Algonquian-Wakashan. Part 1: Proof of the Algonquian-Wakashan relationship},
  author={Sergei L. Nikolaev},
  journal={Journal of Language Relationship},
  year={2015},
  volume={13},
  pages={23 - 62}
}
The first part of the present study, following a general introduction (§ 1), presents a classification and approximate glottochronological dating for the Algonquian-Wakashan languages (§ 2), a preliminary discussion of regular sound correspondences between Proto-Wakashan, Proto-Nivkh, and Proto-Algic (§ 3), and an analysis of the Algonquian-Wakashan “basic lexicon” (§ 4). The main novelty of the present article is in its attempt at formal demonstration of a genetic relationship between the… 

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