Toward the Concept of Collective Security: The Bryce Group's “Proposals for the Avoidance of War, ” 1914–1917

@article{Dubin1970TowardTC,
  title={Toward the Concept of Collective Security: The Bryce Group's “Proposals for the Avoidance of War, ” 1914–1917},
  author={Martin David Dubin},
  journal={International Organization},
  year={1970},
  volume={24},
  pages={288 - 318}
}
  • M. D. Dubin
  • Published 1 March 1970
  • History
  • International Organization
A remarkable document in the history of international organization is a detailed constitution for a league of nations which was given limited distribution in March 1915 under the title “Proposals for the Avoidance of War”. Prepared by British liberal and socialist critics of prewar British diplomacy headed by Lord Bryce, the historian, jurist, and retired ambassador to the United States, it undoubtedly was the single most influential scheme for a league of nations produced during the First… 

The League of Nations: a retreat from international law?*

Abstract During the First World War, civil society groups across the North Atlantic put forward an array of plans for recasting international society. The most prominent ones sought to build on the

The Use of Force to Prevent War? The Bryce Group's “Proposals for the Avoidance of War,” 1914–15

Abstract This article reappraises the debate about war prevention in the Bryce Group, the first study circle in Britain to devise a plan for the League of Nations. While scholars have tended to

"They Look in vain": British Foreign Policy Dissent and the Quest for a Negotiated Peace during the Great War with Particular Emphasis on 1917

Within the extensive literature on British dissent in the First World War, there is a significant lack of study on the critical year of the War, 1917. This thesis addresses this omission by examining

America's Liberal Illiberalism: The Ideological Origins of Overreaction in U.S. Foreign Policy

  • M. Desch
  • Political Science
    International Security
  • 2008
Why has the United States, with its long-standing Liberal tradition, come to embrace the illiberal policies it has in recent years? The conventional wisdom is that al-Qaida's attacks on the United

Ethics, economics and power in the Cambridge Apostles’ internationalism between the two world wars

This article reviews the rich internationalist literature produced by a group of Cambridge Apostles in the interwar years, and evaluates it in the context of contemporary British idealist thought.

Ethics, economics and power in the Cambridge Apostles’ internationalism between the two world wars

This article reviews the rich internationalist literature produced by a group of Cambridge Apostles in the interwar years, and evaluates it in the context of contemporary British idealist thought.

Isolationism of a Kind: Two Generations of World Court Historiography in the United States

  • M. Dunne
  • History
    Journal of American Studies
  • 1987
With these apocryphal words from the proverbial doughboy, Charles Homer Haskins lightened his presidential address to the American Historical Association in December 1922. Haskins's theme was the

‘Peace throughout the oceans and seas of the world’: British maritime strategic thought and world order, 1892–1919

Prior to 1914, British strategic thinkers considered the question of how to maintain British world power in the twentieth century. They developed visions of co-operation at sea between not only

The Apostles’ justice: Cambridge reflections on economic inequality from Moore’s Principia Ethica to Keynes’s General Theory (1903–36)

This article explores economic justice in the writings of the Cambridge authors G. L. Dickinson, G. Shove, R. Hawtrey, D. H. Robertson, H.O. Meredith, J. H. Bell and F. Ramsey, who were either

The Internationalists as grand narrative: Key elements and dilemmata

Abstract: In this contribution, the key elements of the book’s progress narrative will be discussed. The focus will be set on the ‘backbone’ of the book, which consists of three ideas or elements:

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 17 REFERENCES

The League to Enforce Peace.

T HE President of the United States in his war message said that there were two purposes for which we were fighting: one, to make democracy safe on earth; the other, to substitute co-operation for

Peace without victory : Woodrow Wilson and the British liberals

and potent weapon to the service of national interests. While the parallels are limited, modern students of these dilemmas will find the German experience both illuminating and depressing. Most

VI. Lord Bryce and the First World War

James Bryce considered that 1914 would be a satisfying year. He had just been created a viscount and, at the age of seventy-six, could look back on a career of distinction in university life,

A league to enforce peace