Toward an Epistemologically-Relevant Sociology of Science*

@article{Campbell1985TowardAE,
  title={Toward an Epistemologically-Relevant Sociology of Science*},
  author={D. Campbell},
  journal={Science, Technology, & Human Values},
  year={1985},
  volume={10},
  pages={38 - 48}
}
  • D. Campbell
  • Published 1985
  • Sociology
  • Science, Technology, & Human Values
Donald Campbell: I would have liked to have presented here, for your critical comments, a welldeveloped social theory of how science works when science is successfully improving scientific beliefs. I will refer to such a theory as an epistemologicallyrelevant sociology of science, even though no such theory is available. The people who are most assiduously studying the sociology of science are reluctant to add this policy-relevant domain to their task, primarily because they, along with most… Expand
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