Toward a new synthesis: population genetics and evolutionary developmental biology

@article{Johnson2004TowardAN,
  title={Toward a new synthesis: population genetics and evolutionary developmental biology},
  author={Norman A. Johnson and Adam H. Porter},
  journal={Genetica},
  year={2004},
  volume={112-113},
  pages={45-58}
}
Despite the recent synthesis of developmental genetics and evolutionary biology, current theories of adaptation are still strictly phenomenological and do not yet consider the implications of how phenotypes are constructed from genotypes. Given the ubiquity of regulatory genetic pathways in developmental processes, we contend that study of the population genetics of these pathways should become a major research program. We discuss the role divergence in regulatory developmental genetic pathways… 
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