Toward a Quantitative Definition of Manual Lifting Postures

@article{BurgessLimerick1997TowardAQ,
  title={Toward a Quantitative Definition of Manual Lifting Postures},
  author={Robin J. Burgess-Limerick and Bruce Abernethy},
  journal={Human factors},
  year={1997},
  volume={39 1},
  pages={
          141-8
        }
}
Manual lifting techniques are commonly defined in terms of the postures adopted at the start of the lift. Quantitative definition is problematic, however, because the absolute joint angles adopted to lift an object are influenced by task parameters, such as the initial height of the load. We present an argument for the use of a postural index (the ratio of knee flexion from normal standing to the sum of ankle, hip, and lumbar vertebral flexion) to define the postures adopted at the start of… CONTINUE READING

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