Tourist Worries after Terrorist Attacks: Report from a Field Experiment

@article{Brun2011TouristWA,
  title={Tourist Worries after Terrorist Attacks: Report from a Field Experiment},
  author={Wibecke Brun and Katharina Wolff and Svein Larsen},
  journal={Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and Tourism},
  year={2011},
  volume={11},
  pages={387 - 394}
}
The current study reports the results of a field experiment measuring tourist worries assessed by the Tourist Worry Scale (TWS) before and after the terror bombings in London during the summer of 2005. As part of a larger study on tourist experiences, tourists on vacation to Mallorca, Spain, were asked to fill in a questionnaire prior to the bombings. A follow up study was administered about seven weeks after the terror attacks. The results showed sum scores on the TWS to remain stable over the… 
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