Tough Times at La Brea: Tooth Breakage in Large Carnivores of the Late Pleistocene

@article{Vanvalkenburgh1993ToughTA,
  title={Tough Times at La Brea: Tooth Breakage in Large Carnivores of the Late Pleistocene},
  author={B Vanvalkenburgh and Fritz Hertel},
  journal={Science},
  year={1993},
  volume={261},
  pages={456 - 459}
}
One million to two million years ago, most of today's large, predatory mammals coexisted with larger extinct species, such as saber-toothed cats and giant running bears. Comparisons of tooth fracture frequencies from modern and Pleistocene carnivores imply that predator-prey dynamics and interspecific interactions must have been substantially different 36,000 to 10,000 years ago. Tooth fracture frequencies of four Rancho La Brea species—dire wolf, coyote, saber-toothed cat, and American lion… 
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  • 1993
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