Totozoquean1

@article{Brown2011Totozoquean1,
  title={Totozoquean1},
  author={Cecil H. Brown and David Beck and Grzegorz Kondrak and James K. Watters and S{\o}ren Wichmann},
  journal={International Journal of American Linguistics},
  year={2011},
  volume={77},
  pages={323 - 372}
}
This paper uses the comparative method of historical linguistics to investigate the hypothesis that languages of two well-established families of Mesoamerica, Totonacan and Mixe-Zoquean, are related in a larger genetic grouping dubbed Totozoquean. Proposed cognate sets comparing words reconstructed for Proto-Totonacan (PTn) and Proto-Mixe-Zoquean (PMZ) show regular sound correspondences attesting to the descent of these two languages from Proto-Totozoquean (PTz). Identification of sound… Expand
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Acoustic properties of vowels in Upper Necaxa Totonac
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Ideophones, Adverbs, and Predicate Qualification in Upper Necaxa Totonac1
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  • History
  • International Journal of American Linguistics
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(2) Upper Necaxa Zapotitlan Papantla Xicotepec Tepehua maʔát ‘far’ maqát máqat maqát máqati móŋʔʃu ‘owl’ móɴqʃu moɴqʃnú móɴqsɬu móːqʃnuː In each of these cases (and many more), the Upper Necaxa formExpand
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1 A number of people have contributed to this project by offering critical comments on drafts of this article or in other important ways, and we wish to thank them here. These include E. WyllysExpand
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