Torturing scienceScience, interrogational torture, and public policy

@article{OMara2020TorturingSI,
  title={Torturing scienceScience, interrogational torture, and public policy},
  author={Shane M. O’Mara and John W. Schiemann},
  journal={Politics \& Life Sciences},
  year={2020},
  volume={38},
  pages={180 - 192}
}
Abstract. Contrary to the claims of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) that its torture program was scientific, the program was not based on biology or any other science. Instead, the George W. Bush administration veneered the program's justification with a patina of pseudoscience, ignoring the actual biology of torturing human brains. We reconstruct the Bush administration's decision-making process to establish that the policy decision to use torture took place in the immediate aftermath of… Expand
1 Citations
How Torture Fails: Evidence of Misinformation from Torture-Induced Confessions in Iraq
This article examines the testimony of fifty-seven torture victims in Saddam Hussein's Iraq to illustrate the processes by which torture fails to gain true confessions or accurate information.Expand

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