Torpor and activity patterns in free-ranging sugar gliders Petaurus breviceps (Marsupialia)

@article{Krtner2000TorporAA,
  title={Torpor and activity patterns in free-ranging sugar gliders Petaurus breviceps (Marsupialia)},
  author={Gerhard K{\"o}rtner and Fritz Geiser},
  journal={Oecologia},
  year={2000},
  volume={123},
  pages={350-357}
}
Abstract Almost all studies on daily torpor in mammals have been conducted in the laboratory under constant environmental conditions. We investigated torpor and activity patterns in free-ranging sugar gliders (Petaurus breviceps, 100 g) using temperature telemetry and compared field data with published information obtained in the laboratory. Body and/or skin temperature and activity patterns of 12 sugar gliders were monitored from autumn to spring. Healthy sugar gliders were active between… 
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