Topology of hepatitis C virus envelope glycoproteins

@article{Opdebeeck2003TopologyOH,
  title={Topology of hepatitis C virus envelope glycoproteins},
  author={Anne Op de beeck and Jean Dubuisson},
  journal={Reviews in Medical Virology},
  year={2003},
  volume={13}
}
Hepatitis C virus encodes two envelope glycoproteins, E1 and E2, that are released from a polyprotein precursor after cleavage by host signal peptidase(s). These proteins contain a large N‐terminal ectodomain and a C‐terminal transmembrane domain, and they assemble as a noncovalent heterodimer. The transmembrane domains of hepatitis C virus envelope glycoproteins have been shown to be multifunctional: (1) they are membrane anchors, (2) they bear ER retention signals, (3) they contain a signal… 
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TLDR
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