Topical glycopyrrolate for patients with facial hyperhidrosis

@article{Kim2008TopicalGF,
  title={Topical glycopyrrolate for patients with facial hyperhidrosis},
  author={W. O. Kim and H. K. Kil and Kyung Bong Yoon and Duck Me Yoon},
  journal={British Journal of Dermatology},
  year={2008},
  volume={158}
}
Background  Facial hyperhidrosis may negatively impact the quality of life. Although various conservative modalities have been suggested, the condition is not often treated successfully. 
Efficacy and safety of topical glycopyrrolate in patients with facial hyperhidrosis: a randomized, multicentre, double‐blinded, placebo‐controlled, split‐face study
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  • Medicine, Psychology
    Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology : JEADV
  • 2015
Although facial hyperhidrosis has been frequently associated with a diminished quality of life, various conservative modalities for its management are still far from satisfactory.
A glycopyrronium bromide 1% cream for topical treatment of primary axillary hyperhidrosis: efficacy and safety results from a phase IIIa randomized controlled trial
TLDR
1% GPB cream may provide an effective new treatment option exhibiting a good safety profile for patients with primary axillary hyperhidrosis.
Topical glycopyrrolate reduces axillary hyperhidrosis
  • D. Baker
  • Medicine
    Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology : JEADV
  • 2016
TLDR
The initial effectiveness of 1% and 2% topical glycopyrrolate spray is determined and this is compared with Botulinum toxin type A injections for the management of axillary hyperhidrosis.
Managing hyperhidrosis: emerging therapies.
Atropine-like poisoning caused by topical use of undiluted topical robinul
A case is described in which a patient inadvertently applied undiluted Robinul to a sweat rash in the groin and experienced two episodes of atropine-like poisoning. We highlight important diagnostic
Craniofacial hyperhidrosis can usually be managed pharmacologically, but surgery may sometimes be needed
TLDR
Patients who do not respond to pharmacological therapy may benefit from endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy or one of its variations, however, such surgery is often associated with high rates of troublesome and embarrassing compensatory sweating.
Emerging Nonsurgical Treatments for Hyperhidrosis.
Topical therapies in hyperhidrosis care.
Sweat and tears: treating the patient with primary hyperhidrosis.
  • T. Wheeler
  • Medicine, Psychology
    British journal of nursing
  • 2012
TLDR
Treatment options for primary hyperhidrosis are varied, including topical treatments, Botulinum toxin A, systemic medication, iontophoresis and surgery; however, each method has drawbacks that are discussed in this article.
Axillary hyperhidrosis: a focused review
TLDR
The objective of this paper is to review the epidemiology, clinical presentation, pathophysiology, histology, genetics, and management and treatment of axillary hyperhidrosis.
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References

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The use of topical glycopyrrolate in the treatment of hyperhidrosis
The use of an aqueous solution of 0.5% topical glycopyrollate was effective in the treatment of hyperhidrosis of the scalp and forehead after other treatments had proved ineffective; this appears to
Effective treatment of frontal hyperhidrosis with botulinum toxin A
TLDR
Botulinum toxin A has been shown to be a very effective treatment for focal hyperhidrosis of the axillae and palms.
Treatment of Focal Hyperhidrosis
TLDR
Topical or systemic therapies may be helpful for patients with mild disease and botulinum toxin A (Botox, Allergan Inc., Irvine, CA) is currently approved in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, and many other countries for the treatment of axillary hyperhidrosis.
Focal hyperhidrosis: diagnosis and management
TLDR
The condition carries a substantial psychological and social burden, since it interferes with daily activities, and early detection and management of hyperhidrosis can significantly improve a patient's quality of life.
Factors affecting outcome following endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy
TLDR
This study investigated whether age, sex or bodyweight influenced the outcome of endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy for palmar hyperhidrosis.
Craniofacial hyperhidrosis successfully treated with topical glycopyrrolate.
TLDR
It is concluded that topical glycopyrrolate is effective in treating craniofacial hyperhidrosis and is associated with few adverse effects.
Topical glycopyrrolate should not be overlooked in treatment of focal hyperhidrosis
TLDR
Topical glycopyrrolate is indicated mainly for the head and neck and various types of gustatory sweating and is effective and well tolerated, and the cost to date has been very high, at £250 for 100 2-mg tablets, making it difficult to fund for many patients.
Diabetic gustatory sweating successfully treated with topical glycopyrrolate: report of a case and review of the literature.
TLDR
For moderate to severe symptoms of diabetic gustatory sweating, topical application of glycopyrrolate is safe, effective, well tolerated, and convenient.
Treatment of compensatory gustatory hyperhidrosis with topical glycopyrrolate.
TLDR
The topical application of a glycopyrrolate pad appeared to be safe, efficacious, well tolerated, and a convenient method of treatment for moderate to severe symptoms of gustatory hyperhidrosis in post transthoracic endoscopic sympathectomy or sympathicotomy patients, with few side effects.
An epidemiological study of hyperhidrosis.
TLDR
A descriptive, multicenter study of patterns of patients referred for treatment of focal hyperhidrosis, demonstrating novel findings, especially in the differing presentations ofhyperhidrosis between men and women.
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