Topical capsaicin in humans: parallel loss of epidermal nerve fibers and pain sensation

@article{Nolano1999TopicalCI,
  title={Topical capsaicin in humans: parallel loss of epidermal nerve fibers and pain sensation},
  author={Maria Nolano and Donald A. Simone and Gwen Wendelschafer‐Crabb and T Johnson and Eric Hazen and William R. Kennedy},
  journal={Pain},
  year={1999},
  volume={81},
  pages={135-145}
}
Capsaicin applied topically to human skin produces itching, pricking and burning sensations due to excitation of nociceptors. With repeated application, these positive sensory responses are followed by a prolonged period of hypalgesia that is usually referred to as desensitization, or nociceptor inactivation. Consequently, capsaicin has been recommended as a treatment for a variety of painful syndromes. The precise mechanisms that account for nociceptor desensitization and hypalgesia are… Expand
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TLDR
Data show that sensory dysfunction after capsaicin application to the skin results from rapid degeneration of intracutaneous nerve fibers, which is likely to account for its analgesic properties. Expand
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It is concluded that, through modulation of cutaneous vascular reactions, peptidergic sensory nerves may play a hitherto unrecognized role in the pathomechanism of certain diseases of human skin. Expand
Early and late effects of prolonged topical capsaicin on cutaneous sensibility and neurogenic vasodilatation in humans
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It is shown that the decrease in heat pain is temporary and is maintained with repeated capsaicin application, and there appears to be a therapeutic role for Capsaicin in cutaneous painful syndromes mediated, at least in part, by activity of heat‐sensitive nociceptors. Expand
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TLDR
It is concluded that capsaicin is a selective sensory blocking agent which acts by stimulation and subsequent sensory blockage of polymodal nociceptors and warm receptors. Expand
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TLDR
Over a period from several days to several weeks after treatment, flare was diminished and heat pain thresholds were slightly elevated, which may be due to long‐lasting damage of cutaneous nerve terminals by capsaicin. Expand
Topical Capsaicin in Painful Diabetic Neuropathy: Controlled Study With Long-Term Follow-Up
TLDR
Results from this preliminary study suggest that topical 0.075' capsaicin may be of value in subjects with diabetic neuropathy and intractable pain. Expand
Treatment of chronic postherpetic neuralgia with topical capsaicin. A preliminary study.
TLDR
It is suggested that topical application of capsaicin may provide a useful approach for alleviating postherpetic neuralgia and other syndromes characterized by severe localized pain. Expand
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TLDR
Although the results and those of others show no adverse effects of topical 0.075% capsaicin on human sensory function, even in subjects with preexisting neuropathic sensory impairment, the small number of subjects tested does not justify an inferential statement on safety. Expand
The consequences of long-term topical capsaicin application in the rat
TLDR
The results suggest that the topical application of capsaicin at low concentration produces a reversible impairment of the terminals of C fibres in the skin without greatly exciting those fibres and without affecting the properties of cell soma. Expand
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