Topical Antimicrobial Treatment of Acne Vulgaris

@article{Gamble2012TopicalAT,
  title={Topical Antimicrobial Treatment of Acne Vulgaris},
  author={Ryan G. Gamble and Jeff Dunn and Annelise L. Dawson and Brian Petersen and Lauren McLaughlin and Alison Small and Scott A. Kindle and Robert Paul Dellavalle},
  journal={American Journal of Clinical Dermatology},
  year={2012},
  volume={13},
  pages={141-152}
}
Topical antimicrobial treatment is indicated for mild to moderate acne vulgaris. Our literature review includes searches of Ovid, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the databases of the Cochrane Library. A detailed search strategy is included. All searches were limited to controlled trials and systematic reviews. No year limits were applied to the searches, but we focused on trials, guidelines, and reviews published since 2004, the year that the last review of topical antimicrobials was published in this… 

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The best evidence available for individualized treatment of acne is reviewed to review, with a focus on randomized controlled trials, meta-analyses, and other systematic reviews.

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This review considers data on topical fixed-combination acne medications and developments focused on newer lower concentration, optimized formulations aimed at reducing dryness and irritation without compromising efficacy.

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These findings suggest that antibiotics should be prescribed in combination with benzoyl peroxide and/or topical retinoids and be limited to a maximum of several months.

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The new retinoids (eg, adapalene) have an additional antiinflammatory action along with their effect on the preclinical microcomedo and, coadministered with a topical or an oral antibiotic, are a rational initial therapy for all but the most severe forms of acne.

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A new gel that stably combines 5% benzoyl peroxide and 1% clindamycin has become available to treat mild to moderately severe inflammatory acne, and the decreased development of antibiotic-resistant strains of Propionibacterium acnes demonstrated with the combination gel may prolong treatment efficacy.

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A new gel that stably combines 5% benzoyl peroxide and 1% clindamycin has become available to treat mild to moderately severe inflammatory acne, and the decreased development of antibiotic-resistant strains of Propionibacterium acnes demonstrated with the combination gel may prolong treatment efficacy.
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