Tooth wear and the "design" of the human dentition: a perspective from evolutionary medicine.

@article{Kaifu2003ToothWA,
  title={Tooth wear and the "design" of the human dentition: a perspective from evolutionary medicine.},
  author={Yousuke Kaifu and Kazutaka Kasai and Grant Townsend and Lindsay C. Richards},
  journal={American journal of physical anthropology},
  year={2003},
  volume={Suppl 37},
  pages={
          47-61
        }
}
Worn, flat occlusal surfaces and anterior edge-to-edge occlusion are ubiquitous among the dentitions of prehistoric humans. The concept of attritional occlusion was proposed in the 1950s as a hypothesis to explain these characteristics. The main aspects of this hypothesis are: 1) the dentitions of ancient populations in heavy-wear environments were continuously and dynamically changing owing to life-long attritional tooth reduction and compensatory tooth migration, 2) all contemporary humans… 

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