Tool use in capuchin monkeys: Distinguishing between performing and understanding

@article{Visalberghi2006ToolUI,
  title={Tool use in capuchin monkeys: Distinguishing between performing and understanding},
  author={Elisabetta Visalberghi and Loredana Trinca},
  journal={Primates},
  year={2006},
  volume={30},
  pages={511-521}
}
A horizontal plexiglas tube containing a food-reward was presented to four naive tufted capuchins and suitable sticks were provided to push the reward out. Three monkeys out of four spontaneously used the tools and showed very different styles of solving the task. In more complex conditions, in which the sticks needed to be combined or actively modified in order to become effective, the monkeys were always successful; however, their performance was loaded with errors which did not disappear… 
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TLDR
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