Too far to walk: maternal mortality in context.

@article{Thaddeus1994TooFT,
  title={Too far to walk: maternal mortality in context.},
  author={S. Thaddeus and Deborah Maine},
  journal={Social science \& medicine},
  year={1994},
  volume={38 8},
  pages={
          1091-110
        }
}
Delays in receiving obstetric care and poor maternal outcomes: results from a national multicentre cross-sectional study
TLDR
There was a very clear and significant association between frequency of delay and severity of outcome, suggesting that timely and proper management are related to survival.
The impact of delays on maternal and neonatal outcomes in Ugandan public health facilities: the role of absenteeism
TLDR
The single most important factor contributing to delays and associated adverse outcomes for mothers and babies in Uganda is the failure of doctors to be present at work during contracted hours.
Maternal Mortality in Eastern Zambia: Accessing Healthcare for Delivery and Obstetric Emergencies
TLDR
It is demonstrated that while poor transport is an important barrier, taking into account the economic and socio-cultural context is also crucial to improved maternal health, which underlines the importance of detailed qualitative research before project implementation.
Facility-Based Maternal Death in Western Africa: A Systematic Review
TLDR
It is emphasized that phase I and phase II barriers are not the only factors preventing women from accessing proper emergency obstetric care, and supply-side barriers must be addressed to reduce maternal mortality in the region.
Community perspective of maternal mortality: experience from Konduga Local Government Area, Borno State, Nigeria.
TLDR
There is a good understanding of obstetric complications in the community leading to maternal death, and community enlightenment, health education, training of TBAs, poverty reduction and effective, affordable and reliable transportation are means of obviating delays in the decision and transportation leading to mothers mortality.
Current Status of ‘Essential Obstetric Care’ Activities Internationally: A Literature Review
Reduction of maternal mortality in developing countries today is hindered by limited awareness of the magnitude and manageability of the problem. Ill-informed strategies have diverted attention from
Multivariate Analysis of Maternal Mortality with Implications for Community Participatory Action Learning
Maternal mortality is a global public health issue that requires urgent multi-disciplinary action, especially ones that are designed with the determined commitment of the community itself. The data
Maternal Mortality among Women Seeking Health Care Services in Kisii Level 5 Hospital
TLDR
The study suggests maternal mortality occurs as a result of lack of access to quality healthcare facility poor health seeking behavior and poor socio-economic factors.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 115 REFERENCES
Barriers to treatment of obstetric emergencies in rural communities of West Africa. The Prevention of Maternal Mortality Network.
TLDR
Findings illustrate how sociocultural factors, such as societal expectations and the role of women, affect the use of health services and provide an example of how qualitative methodology can be used to obtain substantive information about a community's frustrations and needs with respect to health care.
Preventing Maternal Deaths
TLDR
The capacity of simple, inexpensive preventive measures to have a major impact on the death and suffering so long condoned as part of motherhood is underscored.
Survey on institutional maternal deaths in four regions of Tanzania July 1983-December 1984: preliminary report.
TLDR
The 3 main causes of deaths: sepsis hemorrhage and anemia are also found to be the most important associated causes of death, and something must be done to reverse the trend.
Analysis of maternal deaths in the Central Region of Malawi.
TLDR
A maternal death survey was conducted in the Central Region of Malawi in 1977 in an effort to determine if most maternal deaths were caused by factors outside the control of the recognized maternity services and whether the training of traditional birth attendants would be of value.
Preliminary report on maternal deaths in the Southern Highlands of Tanzania in 1983.
TLDR
The main avoidable factors were lack of blood for transfusion, no partogram being kept in labor, and risk factors noted but not acted upon.
The impact of public health services on mortality: a study of mortality differentials in a rural area of Nigeria
TLDR
It was concluded that mortality decline during the last half century may be almost wholly explained by introduced modern health services, and that the mortality Decline under five years of age was largely explained by very great differences in mortality under five children of age.
Maternal mortality in rural Bangladesh: the Tangail District.
TLDR
The major causes of maternal mortality were found to be obstructed labor and sepsis caused by improperly performed abortion, and those at high risk were mothers below age 20 and above age 30 and those above parity four.
Giving birth is safer now.
TLDR
The most striking changes in the main causes of maternal death have been in deaths from toxemia of pregnancy and the puerperium which fell from 35 to under 4/100000 live births between 1960-84 and in Deaths from hemorrhage which dropped from 32 to under 2/ 100000 over the same period.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...