Tomatoes, tomato-based products, lycopene, and cancer: review of the epidemiologic literature.

@article{Giovannucci1999TomatoesTP,
  title={Tomatoes, tomato-based products, lycopene, and cancer: review of the epidemiologic literature.},
  author={Edward L. Giovannucci},
  journal={Journal of the National Cancer Institute},
  year={1999},
  volume={91 4},
  pages={
          317-31
        }
}
  • E. Giovannucci
  • Published 1999
  • Medicine
  • Journal of the National Cancer Institute
The epidemiologic literature in the English language regarding intake of tomatoes and tomato-based products and blood lycopene (a compound derived predominantly from tomatoes) level in relation to the risk of various cancers was reviewed. Among 72 studies identified, 57 reported inverse associations between tomato intake or blood lycopene level and the risk of cancer at a defined anatomic site; 35 of these inverse associations were statistically significant. No study indicated that higher… Expand
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
Experimental data from this and other laboratories that support the hypothesis that whole tomato and its phytochemical components reduce the risk of prostate cancer are presented. Expand
Tomatoes, Lycopene Intake, and Digestive Tract and Female Hormone-Related Neoplasms
TLDR
The inverse relation between lycopene and upper digestive tract neoplasms was not explained by alcohol or tobacco, sociodemographic factors, or total energy Intake. Expand
A prospective study of tomato products, lycopene, and prostate cancer risk.
TLDR
Frequent consumption of tomato products is associated with a lower risk of prostate cancer, and these associations persisted in analyses controlling for fruit and vegetable consumption and for olive oil use and were observed separately in men of Southern European or other Caucasian ancestry. Expand
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