Tomato consumption and prostate cancer risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis

@article{Xu2016TomatoCA,
  title={Tomato consumption and prostate cancer risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis},
  author={Xin Xu and Jiangfeng Li and Xiao Wang and Song Wang and Shuai Meng and Yi Zhu and Zhen Liang and Xiangyi Zheng and Liping Xie},
  journal={Scientific Reports},
  year={2016},
  volume={6}
}
Previous studies have reported controversial results on the association between tomato consumption and prostate cancer risk. Hence, we performed a meta-analysis to comprehensively evaluate this relationship. A total of 24 published studies with 15,099 cases were included. Relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were pooled with a random-effects model. Tomato intake was associated with a reduced risk of prostate cancer (RR 0.86, 95% CI 0.75–0.98, P = 0.019; P < 0.001 for… Expand

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