Tobacco smoking and risk of bladder cancer

@article{Boffetta2008TobaccoSA,
  title={Tobacco smoking and risk of bladder cancer},
  author={Paolo Boffetta},
  journal={Scandinavian Journal of Urology and Nephrology},
  year={2008},
  volume={42},
  pages={45 - 54}
}
  • P. Boffetta
  • Published 1 January 2008
  • Medicine
  • Scandinavian Journal of Urology and Nephrology
Tobacco smoking is the main known cause of urinary bladder cancer in humans. In most populations, over half of cases in men and a sizeable proportion in women are attributable to this habit. Epidemiological studies conducted in different populations have shown a linear relationship between intensity and duration of smoking and risk. Quitting smoking reduces the risk of bladder cancer. Smoking black (air-cured) cigarettes results in a higher risk than smoking blond (flue-cured) tobacco… 
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TLDR
The odds ratio of bladder cancer was estimated at 3.95 for all smokers vs. non‐smokers, but there was a significant interaction between these 2 parameters, since the risk only increased with average daily consumption when the duration exceeded 20 years.
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TLDR
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TLDR
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