To replace or not to replace: the significance of reduced functional tooth replacement in marsupial and placental mammals

@inproceedings{vanNievelt2005ToRO,
  title={To replace or not to replace: the significance of reduced functional tooth replacement in marsupial and placental mammals},
  author={Alexander F. H. van Nievelt and Kathleen K. Smith},
  booktitle={Paleobiology},
  year={2005}
}
Abstract Marsupial mammals are characterized by a pattern of dental replacement thought to be unique. The apparent primitive therian pattern is two functional generations of teeth at the incisor, canine, and premolar loci, and a series of molar teeth, which by definition are never replaced. In marsupials, the incisor, canine, and first and second premolar positions possess only a single functional generation. Recently this pattern of dental development has been hypothesized to be a synapomorphy… 

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