To mitigate, resist, or undo: addressing structural influences on the health of urban populations.

@article{Geronimus2000ToMR,
  title={To mitigate, resist, or undo: addressing structural influences on the health of urban populations.},
  author={Arline T Geronimus},
  journal={American journal of public health},
  year={2000},
  volume={90 6},
  pages={
          867-72
        }
}
  • A. Geronimus
  • Published 2000
  • Political Science, Medicine
  • American journal of public health
Young to middle-aged residents of impoverished urban areas suffer extra-ordinary rates of excess mortality, to which deaths from chronic disease contribute heavily. Understanding of urban health disadvantages and attempts to reverse them will be incomplete if the structural factors that produced modern minority ghettos in central cities are not taken into account. Dynamic conceptions of the role of race/ethnicity in producing health inequalities must encompass (1) social relationship between… Expand
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