To give and to give not: The behavioral ecology of human food transfers

@article{Gurven2004ToGA,
  title={To give and to give not: The behavioral ecology of human food transfers},
  author={Michael D. Gurven},
  journal={Behavioral and Brain Sciences},
  year={2004},
  volume={27},
  pages={543 - 559}
}
  • M. Gurven
  • Published 1 August 2004
  • Psychology
  • Behavioral and Brain Sciences
The transfer of food among group members is a ubiquitous feature of small-scale forager and forager-agricultural populations. The uniqueness of pervasive sharing among humans, especially among unrelated individuals, has led researchers to evaluate numerous hypotheses about the adaptive functions and patterns of sharing in different ecologies. This article attempts to organize available cross-cultural evidence pertaining to several contentious evolutionary models: kin selection, reciprocal… 

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Reciprocal altruism and food sharing decisions among Hiwi and Ache hunter–gatherers

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  • Psychology
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A model of optimal sharing breadth and depth is presented, based on a general non-tit-for-tat form of risk-reduction based reciprocal altruism, and a series of predictions using data from Hiwi and Ache foragers are tested.

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