"To everything there is a season": some Shakespearean models of normal and anomalous aging.

Abstract

Shakespeare perceived aging characters as falling broadly into two categories: normal and anomalous. The former age in conformity to societal expectations, often displaying an inability to affect the outcome of events; the latter (e.g., Lear and Falstaff), deviating from these behavioral norms, dominate the action of their respective plays. Falstaff, a prime example of the anomalous ager, suffers rejection by King Henry V, his former boon companion, a consequence of ageism.

Cite this paper

@article{Donow1992ToET, title={"To everything there is a season": some Shakespearean models of normal and anomalous aging.}, author={Herbert S. Donow}, journal={The Gerontologist}, year={1992}, volume={32 6}, pages={733-8} }