To eat or not to eat red meat. A closer look at the relationship between restrained eating and vegetarianism in college females

@article{Forestell2012ToEO,
  title={To eat or not to eat red meat. A closer look at the relationship between restrained eating and vegetarianism in college females},
  author={C. Forestell and A. Spaeth and Stephanie A. Kane},
  journal={Appetite},
  year={2012},
  volume={58},
  pages={319-325}
}
Previous research has suggested that vegetarianism may serve as a mask for restrained eating. The purpose of this study was to compare the dietary habits and lifestyle behaviors of vegetarians (n=55), pesco-vegetarians (n=28), semi-vegetarians (n=29), and flexitarians (n=37), to omnivores (n=91), who do not restrict animal products from their diets. A convenience sample of college-age females completed questionnaires about their eating habits, food choice motivations, and personality… Expand
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