Tit-For-Tat in guppies (Poecilia reticulata): the relative nature of cooperation and defection during predator inspection

@article{Dugatkin2005TitForTatIG,
  title={Tit-For-Tat in guppies (Poecilia reticulata): the relative nature of cooperation and defection during predator inspection},
  author={Lee Alan Dugatkin and Michael S. Alfieri},
  journal={Evolutionary Ecology},
  year={2005},
  volume={5},
  pages={300-309}
}
SummaryThe introduction of game-theoretical thinking into evolutionary biology has laid the groundwork for a heuristic view of animal behaviour in which individuals employ ‘strategies’ — rules that instruct them how to behave in a given circumstance to maximize relative fitness. [] Key MethodHere we describe a study in which guppies were tested in multiple predator inspection trials. An individual was tested with its mirror images as well as a series of live conspecifics. Results indicate that guppies are…
Dynamics of the TIT FOR TAT strategy during predator inspection in the guppy (Poecilia reticulata)
  • L. Dugatkin
  • Business
    Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
  • 2004
TLDR
The data support the hypothesis that guppies display the three characteristics associated with the TIT FOR TAT strategy, which are nice, retaliatory, and forgiving.
Interpopulational differences in the use of the Tit-For-Tat strategy during predator inspection in the guppy,Poecilia reticulata
TLDR
The results confirm the prediction that fish from an area of low predation would not display the Tit-For-Tat strategy; males display retaliatory, but not nice and forgiving behaviour, while females display none of the three characteristics.
Predator inspection behaviour in three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus): body size, local predation pressure and cooperation
TLDR
It is confirmed that levels of predator inspection are both population- and situation-dependent, suggesting a trade-off in the potential costs and benefits of this behaviour.
Trinidadian guppies use a social heuristic that can support cooperation among non-kin
TLDR
It is shown that Trinidadian guppies use a ‘walk away’ strategy, a simple social heuristic by which assortment by cooperativeness can come about among mobile agents, supporting theoretical work applying heuristics to understanding the proximate mechanisms underpinning the evolution of cooperation among non-kin.
Kinship reinforces cooperative predator inspection in a cichlid fish
TLDR
Investigation of the effect of genetic relatedness on cooperative predator inspection in juveniles of the cichlid fish Pelvicachromis taeniatus shows that relatedness significantly influenced predator inspection behaviour with kin dyads being significantly more cooperative.
Correlated pay-offs are key to cooperation
TLDR
It is found that neither the cognitive requirements of reciprocal cooperation nor the often sequential nature of interactions are insuperable stumbling blocks for the evolution of reciprocity.
Evolution of non-kin cooperation: social assortment by cooperative phenotype in guppies
TLDR
This study investigated cooperative phenotypes and their link to social structure in wild Trinidadian guppies and found evidence for this in seven out of eight populations and found assortment by cooperativeness, but not by genetic relatedness.
Presence of an audience influences habitat use in male guppies Poecilia reticulate
TLDR
These findings provide an important addition to the existing literature on audience effects by showing that the presence of other individuals can affect more than courtship and aggressive behavior.
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TLDR
The data support the hypothesis that guppies display the three characteristics associated with the TIT FOR TAT strategy, which are nice, retaliatory, and forgiving.
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