Tissue-based map of the human proteome

@article{Uhln2015TissuebasedMO,
  title={Tissue-based map of the human proteome},
  author={Mathias Uhl{\'e}n and Linn Fagerberg and Bj{\"o}rn M. Hallstr{\"o}m and Cecilia Lindskog and Per Oksvold and Adil Mardinoğlu and {\AA}sa Sivertsson and Caroline Kampf and Evelina Sj{\"o}stedt and Anna Asplund and Ingmarie Olsson and Karolina Edlund and Emma Lundberg and Sanjay S. Navani and Cristina Al-Khalili Szigyarto and Jacob Odeberg and Dijana Djureinovic and Jenny Ottosson Takanen and Sophia Hober and Tove Alm and Per-Henrik D Edqvist and Holger Berling and Hanna Tegel and Jan Mulder and Johan Rockberg and Peter Nilsson and Jochen M. Schwenk and Marica Hamsten and Kalle von Feilitzen and Mattias Forsberg and Lukas Persson and Fredric Johansson and Martin Zwahlen and Gunnar von Heijne and Jens B Nielsen and Fredrik Pont{\'e}n},
  journal={Science},
  year={2015},
  volume={347}
}
Protein expression across human tissues Sequencing the human genome gave new insights into human biology and disease. However, the ultimate goal is to understand the dynamic expression of each of the approximately 20,000 protein-coding genes and the function of each protein. Uhlén et al. now present a map of protein expression across 32 human tissues. They not only measured expression at an RNA level, but also used antibody profiling to precisely localize the corresponding proteins. An… 
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