Tissue-Specific and Developmental Effects of the Easily Shocked Mutation on Ethanolamine Kinase Activity and Phospholipid Composition in Drosophila melanogaster

Abstract

The easily shocked (eas) gene of Drosophila melanogaster encodes ethanolamine kinase (EK), the first step in phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) synthesis via the CDP-ethanolamine pathway. Flies mutant for eas display a complex neurological phenotype. In this paper, we look at the contribution of EK to lipid metabolism during Drosophila development with the goal of linking the eas biochemical defect with the organismal phenotype. Using a chromatography-based assay, EK activity was detected in wild-type flies throughout development. Most of the activity in the adult was present in heads, which is primarily tissue of neural origin. Flies mutant for eas showed severely reduced levels of activity at each stage assayed. Using standard extraction methods and thin layer chromatography, phospholipid composition was assayed in whole flies and in heads. While PE levels were decreased significantly in both tissues, heads also had significantly less phosphatidylserine (PS). Therefore, decreases in both phospholipids may play a role in producing the aberrant phenotype in eas flies.

DOI: 10.1023/A:1012209030803

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Cite this paper

@article{Nyako2001TissueSpecificAD, title={Tissue-Specific and Developmental Effects of the Easily Shocked Mutation on Ethanolamine Kinase Activity and Phospholipid Composition in Drosophila melanogaster}, author={Marian Nyako and Camille Marks and Joseph Sherma and Elaine R. Reynolds}, journal={Biochemical Genetics}, year={2001}, volume={39}, pages={339-349} }